27

If you are with other people when you choose to do something on your phone, simply excuse yourself to them: Since we have a few moments here, I think I'll update the case notes on this situation or I have a few emails from head office to deal with if you don't mind If what you are doing is more urgent, you can still telegraph it as you do it: I'd ...


27

There are a couple of suggestions you can try. You can first start with more polite one. If this doesn't work, you can try a more direct approach. When you start having meal or conversation, switch off your phone (It's up to you whether you really turn off the phone or not). However, make sure that the other person must see you turning your phone off. You ...


24

If you can't change the timing of these phone calls, then whenever you start the call make sure to warn your boss of your time limits. Hi Boss! Before we start I just want to give you a heads up that I need to leave by 5pm. I'll keep an eye on the clock to make sure we don't go over. Then you continue your conversation as normal. If she doesn't keep ...


22

Stop talking. Seriously. If they pick up their phone, just stop talking. It's that simple. "So I was at your mother's house last week when..." "What, oh, sorry got a text." "Like I was saying, I was ...." "Sorry funny cat picture." "Anyway, so I was saying, I ..." "So sorry, my mom just messaged me." "Back to what I..." "Text message, go ahead I'm ...


15

You can just say it is a text/call you were expecting from a family member. The reason this works is due to 2 factors You bring up the fact that you are about to check your phone, this is not considered rude compared with just going for your phone and interrupting whatever you were doing. A call from a family member is a perfectly valid reason to pick up ...


11

It all depends on whom and how you are calling someone. If you're calling a private landline, then there is a possibility that people didn't hear it as they may be in another room. A company phone being unanswered usually means there is no one around to pick it up. With cell phones I ALWAYS assume that the person chose to not answer my phone call because ...


9

I hate to sound this cynical, but.... Ya... That sounds more than a little suspicious. At least by US standards were nearly everyone has a cellphone, it's suspicious. To see if it's also suspicious to you, ask yourself a few questions. What kind of emergency does someone have, or would even be aware of, at a library? I know it's harsh, but without a phone, ...


8

Did you want that? Offering to eat/drink their order might offer as a motivator to pay attention to the meal. Anything interesting on there? If it is interesting, it might serve as a conversation starter. Otherwise they might be too embarrassed to show you and put the phone away.


7

First off: any meeting that lasts more than an hour (some would say 45 minutes) is poorly planned. I would NOT mention that to your boss. Try to generate an agenda for these calls so that you both can stay on topic rather than just jabbering for two hours. Over the course of my career, I've frequently found myself offsetting my work day to more closely ...


6

Many companies sell their clients' list to other companies, because they have a business agreement, or because they just make money selling data to someone who won't hurt their business. For instance, some phone companies sell their data to cruise companies. That's why the caller knows your name, location, soemtimes more PII like age, children... and so on. ...


5

What you describe is the typical spiral of a computer or internet addict: They have a problem in the real world (bad at school, bad with girls, can be literally anything). They feel like they cannot accomplish anything of importance. They retreat into the digital world where they can achieve virtual accomplishments. In his case, the bragging right is far ...


5

Like with every kind of addiction the hardest part is to make the person admit they have a problem. You did the right thing trying to address it with him and I would say you should give it a couple more tries before you give up on that option. All the other options I can suggest will not be very popular with your classmates or Josh so they might cause some ...


4

You are overthinking this. If they are on their phone for extended periods of time while in your company, they are the ones being rude to you. Why should you think of the most polite way to call them on it when they clearly don't waste their time thinking about how to be polite to you? Though I must admit, if they are really young, it is possible they don'...


4

Sometime later I felt bad about denying his second request and I didn't feel right Do not listen to that feeling, what you did was exactly right! Helping out once is all well and good, who knows what the situation is, a person may have forgotten the phone or it ran out of battery or something, but that doesn't obligate you to become their phone-servant. If ...


4

I"m going to challenge your question as a whole here. Through most of his life, when he left the house, he was unavailable via phone. That's HIS usage pattern of the phone. Why does he need to adapt to a modern usage pattern? I understand why you want him to do so, but what's the benefit to him? How will it help him out? I'd submit you need to come to ...


3

I faced a similar situation with my mother, who is technically competent but tended to go out either without her phone, or with it turned off. After we had a situation that was complicated and upsetting but wouldn't have been if her phone had been with her and on, we did a sort of post mortem where she ended up concluding that was the issue. That's ...


3

in this situation I like to introduce a game to my opposite: Lets put our mobiles in the center of the table - the first that makes a sound pays the bill. In the game your opposite has something to win - so its attractive to participate. For you its exactly what you wanted. The cellphone rests on the table. You have time to talk now. An other benefit is ...


3

IMHO - if the caller does not identify themselves it's already rude and impolite. There is no need to try to be polite to them. Second, and this is more psychological, when you ask them and they answer you are "in debt" to them. People usually try to return the favour so at least they will listen to the pitch. Because again, they fell it would be rude if ...


2

I'm from France but I believe that there might be some cultural differences that I'm also interested in. My knowledge of French culture and etiquette is limited - I'm UK based so this is from a UK perspective (hope it's still useful!) There's no hard and fast rule on this - but for what it's worth I (and most people I know) would treat a second repeated ...


2

Though, there is no written etiquette regarding the number of times one should try calling or wait for certain time period during each subsequent call. However, there is a procedure I usually follow. I try to call that person 2 times unless they pick the phone. I try calling them the second time as they might have been away from the phone and couldn't hear ...


2

You can't stop her. It is her decision to do so, and chances are very high that she's already aware that she misses out on the lecture's content, and that she decided to do it anyway. All you can do is tell her your opinion on the matter, and hope for her to realize that it in fact is very important to be attentive during class. If she doesn't, or continues ...


2

First point would be to make them actually realize how often they pick up their phone. Talk to the entire family about making a game/challenge out of it. You could use a system like a swear-jar, and every time someone takes out their Phone during dinner or other activities, they have to put a certain amount into it. Keep it small, but consistent, and make ...


2

Where I work we've been informed multiple times to not be seen messing with cell phones, and we are not to connect any personal devices to the networks here at work. Here's what I've done, and it seems to have worked fairly well. Yes, buy a cheap notepad-sized tablet for taking notes. For some reason, tablets look "businesslike", while phones do not. I've ...


2

Give them a few minutes to use their phone. After a few minutes, try to restart the conversation, picking up where you left of. That will remind them of what they should be doing, which is talking to you. If they ignore repeated reminders, they're being rude. The person in front of you, the one you can see, and who can see you, is the most important person ...


2

Unless it's an emergency, there's no need to give your phone, let alone a second time. They should approach someplace else or someone else than having to bother you again. It's strange they don't have their own phone. That said, if they're expecting a call back to your number (which they should have informed earlier) then it's okay to let them answer it, ...


2

In addition to @moonpire00's answer, I think that it would be good to frame this as a question, rather than assuming their consent. Sorry, do you mind if I take/read this? It's _______ (valid reason why it is a particularly important message) Pretty much everyone will consent, but it gives people a chance to voice their opinion, and shows more respect.


1

Something I've done in a similar situation is ask, "Is this a bad time?" And then ... wait. If they actually see your company as more engaging as their phone, they'll get the hint. On the other hand, if the phone really is more captivating and they keep it up, well, it is a bad time. Tell them they seem busy, you'll catch up later, and go do something ...


1

My read on somebody using a personal device for any length of time in a social setting is that they're not interested or engaged in that particular social setting. If both of you are part of a larger social group, it might be an indication that they're indifferent to the current topic of conversation, or that they're awkward within that social group, and ...


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