104

Play stupid games; win stupid prizes... I know that sounds a bit harsh, but if you know that it's an issue that people are passionate about and you play devil's advocate for kicks, don't be too surprised if people want to kick you out. Telling them that you're just playing devil's advocate, because you enjoy debate, is likely to make that worse rather than ...


64

I'm going to focus on the part of your question which is When I have brought up issues that I feel might have caused the Liberals to perform poorly, I am met with hostility and accusations of supporting "an evil party". (Disclaimer: I'm from the US where political tensions have been running very high; I'm not sure if this is more or less so than Canada, ...


30

Politics is a very contentious subject. When you "play devils advocate" you're fostering disagreement where there wasn't any previously. This is especially the case if you are just arguing whatever the opposing viewpoint of your conversational partner takes while being evasive about your actual political views. When someone brings up a counter argument ...


26

I play the Devil's Advocate all the time, I think with a good amount of success (as in, people don't usually get made at me for it). There are a few things I always keep in mind. When you should do it If you know that the person you're talking to appreciates open discourses on contentious subjects. There are some people who do not want their worldview ...


23

There is no appropriate way for you and your estranged father to discuss this on Facebook. Posting links to rebuttals, Snopes etc will only cause him to dig in his heels and damage your nascent relationship. The fact it's in front of his online friends makes it even worse. You have a few off-FB options. You first have to decide whether you want him to stop ...


21

You can't have your cake and eat it too. When it comes to politics I prefer to take the role of a "devil's advocate" instead of firmly entrenching myself into one political party's ideas. contradicts your very next sentence: I do not like to disclose my own vote to people because of hostility from others who voted differently, so I keep it to myself. ...


14

Misandry is a tricky thing, but it's important to remember it hurts both genders. Next time you hear something misandristic, bring up how it hurts women. However, how you phrase it is important. People don't like being told "that thing you said was bad." That's probably a large part of why plainly telling people they're being misandristic hasn't ...


13

Did I do anything wrong in this situation? Yes: you defended Crooked Hillary! Ha-ha, just kidding. Well... Mostly. Let's back up a bit and try to figure out what your actual goal was, and then maybe we can examine where you feel like you fell short of that goal... The day after the United States 2016 election, I attended a public political discussion club ...


13

This is a classic case of words falling on deaf ears. The fact is, we as people like to think we're rational beings, but we're actually driven far more by emotion than we tend to grasp. What you did — and for the purpose of staying on topic here I'm going to completely ignore the politics and just focus on the actions — was to present a fact that ...


10

You need to clear the air with this co-worker. Even if you were in fact secretly an incredibly racist person, and you briefly let your guard down and let it show (I'm not saying that's the case), your co-worker's reaction sounds over the top. Some of the avoiding of you may be embarrassment over the over-reaction. Then given that you're not a racist and don'...


9

1. Don't inform them of anything. Instead, seek to understand their positions fully, and in so doing you will expose yourself to the reasoning underlying their positions and highlight any logical/rhetorical/social problems that their reasoning and/or conclusions may exhibit. I strongly second Farquad's suggestion of the Socratic Method, but would further ...


9

You will never be able to control what other people choose to discuss, unfortunately. You are fully within reasonable expectations to be able to say you dislike the topic. If you are at a social gathering, then it is socially polite for people to take into account that everyone enjoys themselves to a reasonable extent. In general, you can make simple ...


9

Here's an interpersonal skill that I think everyone needs to work on, given the polarization of many of us to very strong beliefs. People with opposing beliefs, even amoral, do not make you a bad person for having a relationship with them. Think about it. Where does the chain of responsibility end? Are you supporting terrorism because you have a friend who ...


8

OK, so while being "very left-leaning" you walked in a nest of conservatives, so you get points for bravery ;) Note: I'm gonna use "leftie" and "rightie" because in my country "libéral" means "free-market capitalist" so it gets confusing versus "liberal," etc. I'm not using them as slurs, just abbreviations. I really didn't like the fact that they moved ...


8

I can relate to your situation a lot more than I'd like to. I never came out to my Dad, but when he was still alive we would go years without speaking to each other largely due to differences in world view and politics. We just couldn't speak to each other without one of us offending the other. I never came out to my dad because he made his views on that ...


8

In politics, when a "group" grows, it tends to attract more and more people, those people come with their own views and take on the general idea represented by the "group". For exemple, Feminism is about fighting the inequalities met by women in society, as to make them 100% equal to men. But, since Feminism is so massive in number, there is many, many ...


8

I don't quite see how the views you describe qualify as liberal, but here's how I typically deal with situations like that. First of all, you won't gain anything by replying "No, I'm not a racist" when someone accuses you of being racist. All you achieve is going into confrontation mode, which for most people is the point where they become irrational. ...


7

I'm sorry, but I think you're going to have to let this one go. There's been several similar questions on the Workplace exchange, and while none are identical to yours, they all carry the same theme: politics creeping into the workplace. How can I avoid divisive political issues at work? Is it reasonable for me to complain about an objectionable newspaper ...


6

Okay... this is usually what I do in a situation where I don't understand the topic yet I want to be involved. Hopefully it will be able to help you out as well. Since you already knew that there will be a lot of politics conversations going on, this is at your advantage as you can do some homework beforehand. It can be as simple as just reading up with on ...


6

One way to try to fix this is to feel out the co-workers on whether they really want to spend their time getting worked up about politics. 24 hour politics can be exhausting even when everyone (pretty much) agrees. Try to sound people out separately from the work discussion. Don't approach it as "please be quiet I'm trying to work" but rather in some ...


6

I've read quite a bit of advice about handling the "Thanksgiving dinner" situation of family members arguing politically, and it generally all boils down to this: react to the part of the conversation that's relevant to your lives, and not to the part that mentions a specific politician or policy. Focus on what they say they are scared of, angry ...


5

First, I have a lot of speculation here about who's saying this and why. Bear with me. Is this group of people actually gathering as feminists ("We now call the Springfield Feminist Association meeting to order"), or are they just a bunch of people hanging out? The gender essentialism inherent in all three quotations really doesn't fit with feminist theory, ...


5

I can sort of relate, my partner and I have similar problems. We generally agree on core issues, but we tend to have very different ideas about solutions. They tend to be more passive, while I lean towards a more active stance... The thing that tends to help us get along, and keep the peace, is giving each other space to be our own people. We're just wired ...


5

Your question is very specifically about a parent so likewise my answer is. We all learn a lot from our parents, but we learn in different ways. Sometimes we learn from their good example; other times we learn from their bad example, or their bad choices. It sounds like you have learned to make different choices, which is fine. It also seems you have a ...


4

I'm also Canadian, but I am going to wade into the politics (now that the election has happened). One thing to understand is that "politics are personal", and vice versa. There are people who can separate the two. Those people are called "privileged": society currently Just Works for them, and will continue to no matter what (...


3

I often find that it works well to state my opinion on a topic, but acknowledge that there is internal conflict over which side is right. A lot of times, people just want to know that you're not a raging partisan for the other side, and that you're able to see their point of view, even if you don't fully agree with them. So -- to cite an example from a ...


3

It's not possible to have an engaging discussion about politics when you know nothing about it. At the best, you can have a one-sided conversation, where the other person is talking and you are just nodding your head or saying something like 'Yes, I agree with X's views/policies' while you have no idea of what's being talked about. You might be more ...


3

Discussing politics, ethics, and philosophy with one's family without causing problems can be very difficult, especially since life-long relationships often involve a good deal of habit and stubbornness, and especially when there is a familial culture of everyone having to agree with a dominant figure. Here are a few things that I find help me: 1) Agree to ...


3

they just continue talking to the rest of the group and I soon find myself in an awkward situation where I'm ignored. This is a common issue in a group discussion, no matter what the topic. A group meeting is not a private lesson. If you monopolize the attention of the whole group while one person explains something to you that everyone else already knows, ...


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