34

Because Mobile phones have made it harder for speakers to compete for their audience's attention, the speaker has to give them more value that their mobiles would never be able to do in that situation. What you have done, by asking them to ask you questions is great! This is the sort of value their mobile phone would be unable to give them. It's a question ...


19

One other thing to consider is that you might be wrong about what people are doing on their phones. I use my phone to take notes at things like faculty meetings and conferences. I find it very convenient to have my notes in electronic form, and using my phone means that I don't have to find a way to lug around and juggle one more thing. If I have an ...


14

Short answer No, short slides with bullet points are better. Long answer There's a pretty good amount of literature out there on this topic, so I'll collect the main points here. When you are giving a presentation, there are two mediums of communication: you and the slides you are presenting from. Your audience can only pay attention to one at a time, which ...


14

But when I am talking in a conference or something, I think that this could be insulting to senior professors etc. You are correct; it would be. Unless you're actually the organizer of the conference, it really isn't your place to make such announcements. You could, however, contact the organizer ahead of time and request that they include a note in the ...


8

Generally hecklers at a seminar are rare. When I help people speak publicly, I tell them a couple things: the audience wants to see you succeed, not fail; the audience hopes more than anything else that you won't be boring and will give you every chance to not be boring. Unfortunately there are sometimes people at these who either don't understand the ...


7

Too many people including professors are dependent on and addicted to their cellphones so you have a real challenge here. You can politely announce right at the beginning of your presentation that you request everyone not to use their cellphones for the duration. That makes your expectation explicit and clear to anybody, so that there is no confusion on the ...


6

I have attended many scientific conferences and given many academic presentations and seminars, and I have never once seen somebody talking on their phone during a session. If people are talking on their phones, that is completely unacceptable and you should just ask them to stop. However, since I have never seen this, I'm going to assume that by "chatting", ...


4

I'm not so sure "polite" is what you want. As you are the speaker, they need to be polite. When I present I am happy to tell the audience that phones must be off or on silent mode, and if anyone has to take a call they have to leave. Make it very plain that is one of the rules you start your presentation with. It's not rude. It's just firm, directive and ...


2

It looks like B is renowned for this behaviour and C has repeatedly witnessed it and is fed up as well. If the two of you are peers or you're in a higher position, you can anticipate it with a comment at the beginning of your speech: I'm sure that B will forgive me if I start my presentation with some background information. It's just five minutes, I ...


2

You're clearly annoyed by his interruptions. And from your story it seems some others are too. I leave it up to your judgment whether his behavior is actually rude. You might want to consider his personality, why he behaves like he does, and whether he will actually change. The interruptions and showing off his knowledge is a dominant controlling management ...


2

You said B is in a higher position than the rest in a comment (if I understood that correct). Now, it really depends on the setting. B might be just trying to optimize the usage of time, because the seminar time is limited and the more time is spent with information that is already known to most, other content may be shortened. I've often seen this in ...


2

State facts factually. While I personally never would, you may include hobbies and personal interests as a very short side note (unless relevant for the job), but keep the tone mostly neutral. If you want to explain why you are looking specifically in England for a job, something like ... Aside from my general interest in your company, I do like the ...


1

Another thing I use my phone (or laptop) for during a presentation is immediate googling of unfamiliar terms. If you use a term I don't understand in your talk, there's a good chance you'll lose my attention anyway. If I find your talk intersting and want to follow it I'll need to look it up. You can't explain everything in a short talk so you'll often ...


1

I usually use peer pressure to do it. Of course, I always ask/tell people to not use their phones beforehand, and always there are some people that do. I have no problems with people's lives interrupting, as long as they leave the lecture room etc to receive phone calls, but there are those that will sit at the front row and just call someone. And those ...


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