24

Short answer: Personally, my reactions to messing up a word vary from nothing to immediate (but not exclaiming) correction, depending on the kind of word I messed up, how much I messed it up, and the reaction of the audience to me messing up. Big technical words uttered in important meetings get an immediate clarification, at other points I just carry on if ...


23

I too am a verified geek. I even went through high school with a briefcase and pocket protector. To compound the problem my family moved very frequently (attended 13 public schools, from 21 addresses, in the 12 years from 1st to 12th grade). Consequently I seldom even bothered to try making friends. Giving presentations on any subject other than computers ...


15

You do not want to trouble the teacher and that's nice of you... ...but he/she is troubling you and this is worth at least an attempt to fix ...and you won't have the chance to trouble him/her anymore anyway, in the future, as you're leaving high school. So I'd suggest to go ahead and attempt the fix. Phase 1 - Request for clarification I'd go with the ...


9

When you have to talk to a large audience, in front of people, whether you know them or not, it's important to use some tricks that will make you feel better because you know you handle the speech and the public will make your speech/story something the audience will want to listen to and follow. I've been taught once, during a 2-days course, the 5 points ...


8

Generally hecklers at a seminar are rare. When I help people speak publicly, I tell them a couple things: the audience wants to see you succeed, not fail; the audience hopes more than anything else that you won't be boring and will give you every chance to not be boring. Unfortunately there are sometimes people at these who either don't understand the ...


7

On top of other answers that give great advice like practice/rehearse in front of friends, here's what I started doing when I had to talk in front of people... When I first had to give a presentation in front of people, I wasn't able to rehearse like that. But I was lucky enough to be in a half-darkened room because of the use of a video projector. If this ...


4

You actually seem to be a very good presenter who understands how to present. You're not creating boring walls of text on PowerPoint - you're using them as aids to supplement your presentation, and not to become the visual focus (which should be done). You have an understanding of various presentation techniques, such as presenter notes as well. I think that ...


4

I took a public speaking course when I got into high school & it helped immensely. If you don't want to take a class, maybe ask some of the English teachers to assist you on listening to things you present for just 10-12 minutes after school. What that course taught me was how to speak on anything with no preparation. We had an exercise we did daily ...


4

This is very late on my part, but since it may still be relevant: Life is full of difficult decisions. You might not WANT to deliver that speech but you did it in the end. You might not WANT to trouble anyone, but that oftentimes simply the cost of rebellion. Going forward, you will face situations that don't have a clear-cut answer. Sometimes, you will have ...


4

I stumble over my words often and use a mix of techniques, usually i try to repeat the word with better pronunciation preceded by a small introduction word such as "sorry", "i meant" or similar We had pengrates -- sorry, pancakes -- We had pengrates -- no, i meant, pancakes -- When I realise the mistake later on, i try to decide if the ...


4

I was mocked for having an English accent when I first moved to Canada. I was younger than you are, and it was really upsetting. I can't control how I speak! In my case I lost the accent very quickly as a form of self preservation. I don't recommend mocking them back. If nothing else, it shows you thinking mocking how people talk is a fine thing to do. What'...


3

This is indeed a known rhetorical technique and it is called conduplicatio. Basically any repetition, whether at the start of sentences or the end of them, will be conduplicatio. I discovered this word by looking for articles on speeches by Martin Luther King, who used this very well. This one lists a number of the techniques he was so good at. Once you ...


3

Usually, I say "or rather", which flows very nicely in the sentence, and is proper enough to be used in novels. We had pengrates, or rather pancakes, with stawberries. Since it's technically proper, it has the least break in flow and makes the mistake seem least embarrassing. However, note that you are using it somewhat ironically, since most uses of "or ...


3

I would recommend a simple guide you would need to practice, which helps from day 1: What helped me to canalize the nervousness was to hold an item on the hands, it can be a pen or a paper, but this helps so you don't think anymore on what to do with the hands. You should have enough material for the time you have to talk, when you read the title of the ...


3

It's a few days after the graduation, and this is how I dealt with it. I did give the speech I simply had to. There was nobody else that was going to give the speech and I don't want to put my teachers in a bad position. The teacher's bosses were there. (The chairman of the school, who we never met before and don't know about.) I added some lines before ...


2

At High School, I was totally unconfident at public speaking, getting "F"s (failing grades, not the other kind) in every speech I ever gave, relying on Cue-cards to get me through, and still stumbling, and being literally "booed" off as I'm giving my speech. I am now able to stand up in any situation, and deliver speeches that have people laughing, crying, ...


2

All great suggestions above. I am 53, a geek, and I still am challenged by presentations. Here are a few more ideas: Tell yourself you are not nervous, you are excited to present your material. Physically, being nervous and being excited are very similar. Take the time to pause a second or three between sections or after making a point. It seems like an ...


2

How can I calm myself down as I'm speaking? I shook like crazy in my first speech in junior high and quickly became the butt of all my classmates jokes. It sucked bad. I learned 2 ways to deal with this, which are not easy, but highly effective: Do something worse on a regular basis. What can you imagine doing publicly that would be worse than public ...


2

It looks like B is renowned for this behaviour and C has repeatedly witnessed it and is fed up as well. If the two of you are peers or you're in a higher position, you can anticipate it with a comment at the beginning of your speech: I'm sure that B will forgive me if I start my presentation with some background information. It's just five minutes, I ...


2

You're clearly annoyed by his interruptions. And from your story it seems some others are too. I leave it up to your judgment whether his behavior is actually rude. You might want to consider his personality, why he behaves like he does, and whether he will actually change. The interruptions and showing off his knowledge is a dominant controlling management ...


2

You said B is in a higher position than the rest in a comment (if I understood that correct). Now, it really depends on the setting. B might be just trying to optimize the usage of time, because the seminar time is limited and the more time is spent with information that is already known to most, other content may be shortened. I've often seen this in ...


1

In addition to conduplicatio as Kate's answer says, another relevant rhetorical technique is parallelism. It can be a subtle difference to spot, and these techniques are by no means exclusive. Conduplicatio is about repeating a word or phrase - like how your example repeats the words "happy" and "change". (As a side note, that seems to be the most general ...


1

Make a joke, so instead of them laughing at you, they're laughing with you. You can say something satirical to make light of the situation, such as: Contrary to what you might believe, people in the UK actually speak pretty good English. As of course you (and hopefully they) know, England is where English comes from, so the British naturally assume theirs ...


1

Sincerity is very persuasive, and it sounds like you sincerely want to serve and leave something behind for this fraternity you're a part of. I would incorporate those desires into your speech. In addition to explaining what you'd like to do as part of the position, talk about why you're running and what it would mean to you to be able to serve your brothers....


1

I have several contingency plans to suggest for your entertainment: I bachelored at UNLV and served on the senate for both of my colleges. Since your position is a little history, photography and web-mastering, I would request for someone quite historical in your college to show-up, dial in, video conference or record a video commentary to be presented ...


1

I hope I'm not being redundant when I say focus on breathing. Stress can cause us to forget to breathe or hyperventilate and either will alter the chemistry of the brain. Seeing red is the end result of not breathing. Carbon monoxide is as important as oxygen to the process. If we don't make use of and then expel the oxygen hydrogen mix that we inspired, ...


1

I find this situation very relatable. It is easy to practice, making pointers for each slide, and prepare in every way possible but when it's time to give the presentation, the heart starts pounding and we become sweaty. I would suggest you should try to focus more on what you are speaking rather than thinking about calming yourself down. You are just ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible