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2

In both of your examples, you ask your partner why they did a thing. This is not explaining a problem at all. It's announcing a problem and demanding they justify or explain what they did. I am not sure that's helpful. Perhaps knowing why would help -- if there was a good reason. Perhaps it would not. The thing about questions is it really gives people a ...


2

His Perspective More often than not in life, I've found myself in the situation that your SO is in. You mention that he doesn't like to admit mistakes. I used to be the same way. The reason I never wanted to admit my mistakes was because I was afraid of people passing judgement on me for them. In those situations, getting questions like the ones you've ...


1

Kat's answer above is great and suggests plenty of actionable things to do. I wanted to add this answer to make sure the OP addresses the root of the problem: how to feel that you are equal in the relationship. It sounds like OP has enough income to support themselves, so the easiest thing to do is to keep ALL finances separate. Sure, your place might be ...


3

I've been on both sides of this. I understand how you don't want to be a mooch, but you also don't want to go broke trying to keep up with them. I had an ex that made a lot more than me, and he loved to live like he earned well (understandably!). I could not afford to live that lifestyle, though. The good news is this is easy to solve by talking. When you'...


6

So, your life sounds similar to mine in a lot of ways. I support myself, I have a daughter and I had my own apartment I stayed in when she was with me. My now-husband's finances are still a mystery to me, to be honest. I live in the US in a southern state where it is just not polite to talk about money. We also met later in life, and for that reason it is ...


-1

I wouldn't bring it up. When you date wealthy people, you should first solve these issues with yourself prior to committing to a relationship, which it seems you didn't. You are gonna have to start digesting her/their lifestyle, otherwise you would likely want to create changes to her life (somewhat and to some extent), which I wouldn't do that, ...


7

As with any interpersonal intimate (not only sexual) relationship, being clear and honest in communicating is the key. Try to tell your partner what you wrote here, communicate what you want and what you are afraid of. Ask you partner for same: what are they afraid of, what they want to do. This is what me and my partner had to go through in order to figure ...


4

I strongly disagree with the accepted answer. I have a few friends who tend to get involved with "bad" people. This is how I handle it. If they are not together: I address my concerns. In your case I would have said something like: Dear B, from my perspective it seems like getting together with C might not be a good idea. I think this because he ...


4

Your boyfriend's behavior sounds like what I would classify as passive aggressiveness, something I used to engage in quite a bit. Thanks to what I learned from my partner's approach with me, I am much better at bringing up my relationship concerns in a more productive manner, so perhaps sharing what they did with me would be helpful for you. (NOTE: I found ...


6

Given that this question was asked nearly two years ago, I assume you've already taken some sort of action. However, I have been on the other side of an eerily similar situation about seven years ago, so perhaps I can provide some insight into how your friend may (have) respond(ed) to the apology. Note that my situation is idiosyncratic, just like all ...


11

I have found in my personal experience that you will likely do more harm to your friendship than help to your friend, in this case. No matter how good a friend you think B is, you should not intervene unless you think she is in some kind of danger. It is more likely B will believe whatever C says anyway - because people in love tend to do that in my ...


3

I think it is very important to know what exactly is your girlfriend's reason for being against 'hard' drugs. If she is personally against drugs that cause any loss of control over mental state, even if temporarily, then you will need to understand that it is very hard to justify taking such drugs even once. Have you considered that she may have already made ...


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