54

What that woman went through is probably one of the most horrible, painful and traumatic experiences one can survive. And, from what you say, she helped your daughter escape the same. She literally saved your child. Can you match this for her? No. Can you pay her back? No. Can you 'just' acknowledge? Yes. As someone who has saved lives (once decades ago, ...


16

I know from my parents that they are very happy for me and were talking about it, so they definitely know (and approve) of it. You have three options : Ask them directly if they sent a card. This of course could result in some small difficulty if they did not. However these days many people regard cards as over-sold by companies who make them for ...


15

Well, since you're using postcrossing and I have done so myself as well, take a look at their community guidelines: All postcards must be registered. These include those that might not match your personal preferences or taste - all postcards must be registered, no exceptions. If you receive a postcard without or with a wrong Postcard ID, Postcrossing ...


9

Just thank them in a low-key, professional way. Being overly effusive about it might give the impression that you feel they have done you a big favor, so instead of something like "Thank you so much for taking care of it, that's excellent!" stick to basic politeness. "Sounds good, thanks." I also work on a developer team, and I often thank my coworkers, ...


8

Theory Let's begin by diving into what The Five Love Languages fundamentally are. From the page linked, it's defined as a theory. It's a conceptual system for determining how a person best gives and receives acts of love. It's a heuristic analogy for helping people understand themselves and others. I would say it's rather abstract and not universally ...


7

Okay. So basically, strangers from all over the world send you postcards, and you're picky about what's on the card? tl;dr: Just let it go. This is like receiving a gift. Some people are good at picking gifts, some will always manage to get you something you don't like even though they have known you forever and they should know by now that you're ...


6

Generally take in the cues. Your coworker thanked you and set the card on your desk. This tells me that your coworker did not really expect you to open it up in front of them. That they kept talking about other topics reinforces that they prefer you do it in your own time. On the other hand if you coworker handed you the card and says thank you. Then ...


6

Haha. It's possible that the sender intentionally tried to poke/tease you by sending the one from your 'dislike' list. Either way, for the first time, I'd recommend either ignoring it altogether or just thanking them. Nothing more. Anything more would have upset them. If this is repeatedly done by the same user, it might be worth letting them know that ...


6

Probably. Generally the only reason someone does that is as a slightly snarky way to remind you to thank them. But don't just say "thankyou" as though it's an automatic response. Either apologize for the omission "sorry, I didn't thank you for [action/item]. [Optional: an explanation of unusual circumstances eg I've been awake 36 hours.] [ [SMILE. You are ...


5

Watch what they do for others that they care about This isn't especially precise, but what I have done when trying to figure out this sort of thing is to watch what people do when they want to make a gesture towards someone else. If someone expresses a lot of compliments towards someone they care about, they might like the same in return. At minimum you have ...


4

OP here Summary of my answer: What I didn't do. Why I didn't want to do it. What I have done. What else I could have done if I had thought of it sooner. After I received the message stating that what I was waiting for would be ready "tonight", I thought about responding: Thanks :) However, the smiley face of Slack was really smiling too much, that's ...


4

I would say it's not necessary to thank someone in western culture (I am from Sydney Australia). However your host would most likely appreciate a thank you, so I think it would be good to do so. In regards to how you should do this, I think in general, the formality and method of saying thanks should match your relationship with the person, the formality of ...


4

It's a bit strange, I was in the exact same scenario a few months ago. I had just started a Co-op through my school as a software developer, and I was having trouble acclimating. One of the guys in my office helped me out constantly, whenever I needed it. If I had a problem, he would usually drop whatever he was doing and come help me. I couldn't have done ...


3

I suggest getting your parents to ask them, directly but tactfully. I'm sure they can speak for themselves but something along the lines of this would capture my concerns: Cliff and his new wife were busy filling out all their thank you cards for the well wishes people sent them on their wedding day and although he was really happy to hear from you he'...


3

In my experience (in the US) it's usually expected to open such right away. People often want to see your pleased reaction. If you are in doubt, give them the choice, like this... "I can't wait to open this!" Then wait for them to come back with one of these (or variants thereof): "So open it already!" "Too bad, you have to wait, ha ha!"


3

Since you volunteered and were apointed to fix it, it became your job to do so. Your boss sent you that message to show appreciation for you volunteering to fix this situation. You're in no way "obligated" to respond to that message. Sebastian Proske has a good point that your boss probably already receives too many mails so he can miss any "chatty" mails ...


3

Here in the UK, I don't think it matters a great deal. Replying with any of these is polite and will let the person know you're acknowledging their kindly meant wishes, but many people wouldn't think twice at which of these you replied with. As a rule of thumb, if someone sends an especially nice or touching message, or it's from someone especially ...


2

Some assumptions: You are unlikely to be postcard-matched with the same person in the future It is customary to send a thank-you note (is this actually true?) Honestly, there's little benefit in instructing your correspondent, especially considering point #1. I'd assume that the sender was acting in good faith and made a mistake, not trying to offend your ...


2

For clarity, your personal demographics are (or at least should be) irrelevant to the situation. There is no reason to let them constrain you. Additionally, I am speaking from the position of Dev and Chief. The Interpersonal Skill here is Professionalism --in a software dev shop, which means as direct and causing as little disruption as possible. For ...


2

I think a card is the right idea, but I personally wouldn't go for a Christmas card. There's a sort of expectation/idea that these are things you send everyone to wish them a merry Christmas, and it might be a bit odd to give one to only a single person. Especially since they tend to be somewhat generic, and in this case you've got a specific reason to give ...


1

Your answer should be timely. Here are a few response options: "Thank you for the warm introduction! I look forward to meeting everyone!" "Thank you for the introduction!I look forward to meeting everyone!" "I appreciate the introduction! I look forward to meeting everyone!" "Thank you! Hello everyone! I look forward to ...


1

Since they did end up helping you, I don't think you lose anything by thanking them. In fact, being gracious about other people's help (even if it's a normal part of their job) can greatly improve work relations. In this example, they might be even less willing to help out the next time if they feel their effort is not appreciated. That does not mean you ...


1

It is perfectly normal to let the email chain end at this point, you don't need to answer, this would only push another mail into your bosses likely already overruning mailbox without any content. You might want to answer, if him verifying your fix needs a follow up action from your side, e.g. closing a ticket attached to the issue. I would then focus the ...


1

Although a Brit, I have family and friends in the USA. In my experience, in the USA it is common to open a gift in front of the giver (Hollywood supports this idea in many movies). When in doubt, ask. A simple "Can I open it now?" would suffice. You said that you noticed the giver glance at the gift on the table more than once - a likely indication that ...


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