100

If you want to meet with someone but don't want them to think you are considering romance, invite them and their partner (if any) to get together with you and your partner / spouse. That makes it clear that nothing is "under the table" or hidden, you are interested in a social encounter rather than a romantic encounter. This advice is based on personal ...


94

Nothing You did something that you thought he might like. He thanked you for it (either because he liked it or because he just wanted to be polite). Unless you want to initiate chit-chat for some reason, there is no need to react in any way. If your friend wanted to discuss the link you sent him, he would have sent a more detailed response. ("Thank you. ...


75

Well, you could try contacting each person in turn, and asking them to give you credit by following the steps you described in your post. You shouldn't bring them stealing your work into the conversation at this stage, however, because most of them will likely not have thought of the situation in those terms, and will likely cooperate with you. Some of ...


68

Welcome to the wise and wonderful world of being a curmudgeon. It's ok many of us stayed in the closet for years, but at some point, you just gotta embrace your inner angry old person and let it out. Ok... Mostly joking... Mostly... I've been a curmudgeon for a long time now. I have expressed open disdain and disappointment with/for lol cats for as long as ...


56

I think you're overthinking this a little, they're thankful for what you sent them. A simple "you're welcome" would suffice, but if you want to carry the conversation on, you could say something like: You're very welcome, I thought you might like it when I saw it and had to share it. This can trigger further conversation about the topic you shared and it ...


43

It is in my opinion rude, but maybe not for the reasons you could think. You have the right to think their texts are pointless, of course. And you have the right to tell them : Sorry, I'm somewhat busy, I can't think about that right now, I'm not interested by this, etc... This is not rude. What is rude is not giving them a return. This is an important ...


39

I think you're massively overthinking this. "Walking away from your problems because you can't handle your own stuff. Why can't you just be different" If you're worried about her, a simple way to enquire would be to ask her something like: "Hey, are you okay? You sound like you just had a bad breakup." You can also ask the same to one of her friends. ...


34

It isn't rude to read and not reply directly. But from the three examples you gave, I would say it would definitely be considered rude by the other person if they never go a reaction from you. To the 'you-might-be-interested-in-this-messages', you certainly don't have to reply immediately. Actually, these are probably the messages that you can ignore for ...


34

Because Mobile phones have made it harder for speakers to compete for their audience's attention, the speaker has to give them more value that their mobiles would never be able to do in that situation. What you have done, by asking them to ask you questions is great! This is the sort of value their mobile phone would be unable to give them. It's a question ...


30

Be explicit I've had this problem a few times, and my choice was always to make it completely explicit. By this I mean stating "I have a partner and nothing romantic is on the table". Of course, don't say this in an accusatory tone, just as matter-of-factly as you can. It is possible that this may make certain people lose interest in trying to befriend ...


29

You could just ask. If he's interested in getting to know you better, and wants to invest the time, asking him for his phone number or for a way to contact him is a pretty reasonable thing to do. Believe it or not, people used to communicate without social media. Way back in the way back, if you wanted to get to know someone you'd ask them for their phone ...


28

I want to tell my friend about my privacy concerns without risking to reduce the strength of our friendship. I would tell them the truth. If they are really your friends, they'll understand. Your life, your rights, your privacy, your choice! Be clear about that. "NO" is sometimes a complete sentence. I also don't want my friend to feel awkward taking ...


23

Maybe I'm out of the loop but I was always of the opinion that "ikr" means "I feel the same way". I was taught as a kid not to say "I know" because "it's rude"... I'm not sure that's true but it's given me the chance to find lots of alternates. The Urban Dictionary page for "I know, right" seems to agree with this. The top definition is It's complete ...


19

One other thing to consider is that you might be wrong about what people are doing on their phones. I use my phone to take notes at things like faculty meetings and conferences. I find it very convenient to have my notes in electronic form, and using my phone means that I don't have to find a way to lug around and juggle one more thing. If I have an ...


19

"If you have ever left me or stopped talking to me for any reason, don't come back without 10 good reasons why I should let you" Personally, and I'm aware that this isn't really IPS centered, but comments like that ooze with a sense of self importance and will cause me to not "come back" purely as a point of principle. Expecting people to explicitly justify ...


18

Maybe try being honest with them. Instead of short replies, I say things about what I got & try to stay polite, but not convey any sense of enjoyment. I might say something like Hey so you know I am not really one to love puppies, but send me all the dark memes you got. Maybe something like this... And then send them one you love. I like ...


18

I've been in a similar boat, and my answer depends heavily on who I'm dealing with. If the person in question is someone I'm on good terms with, and joke around with, I'll be light hearted, and maybe a little self-deprecating. I may very well explain what it is I'm doing. However, if someone is simply being passive-aggressive, I won't hesitate to put them ...


15

I would endeavor to keep others out of the photos in the first place, as you really never know when someone needs to avoid detection. I am reminded of a workshop I once gave to educators. The workshop went really well, and the teachers there enjoyed it very much. I also had photographs taken, and intended to put them on my website. When the workshop ...


15

There's a less sinister reason than you might think for them to download and re-upload: It can be easier. This is especially true if they want to crop them* to highlight their own involvement, or to use on another network. This is understandable as many people use something like a headshot for a profile picture, and you were shooting the event, not a ...


15

Your comment Thanks for the answer. For me this is a sign of weakness. It forces to humiliate yourself asking for explainations she is supposed to give, even better... explainations for a behaviour she is not supposed to have. Her explanation should be due to me. strikes me as concerning. Talking with someone to try to understand them better should not ...


14

Why not be honest about it? Tell the askers what you told us. I don't really like it. So I avoid it. Besides, you can contact me through (other ways listed here) That should be enough. It's not mandatory to maintain an account on any faceplace or flutter. It's the same response I was given once when I asked a friend about it at a time when I used to ...


14

But when I am talking in a conference or something, I think that this could be insulting to senior professors etc. You are correct; it would be. Unless you're actually the organizer of the conference, it really isn't your place to make such announcements. You could, however, contact the organizer ahead of time and request that they include a note in the ...


14

Sorry, I am currently working on Task [xyz] getting ideas from Amazon's design to incorporate into product [zyx] - can I help you with your problem later? Show them that you are currently working on something by mentioning it and the fact that you are busy. You don't have anything to hide, so it's perfectly normal to continue doing what you are doing. The ...


13

Let it be. If friend requests come from people I don't really feel like sharing my personal photos and stuff with, I don't accept, I don't decline, I just ignore it. They'll automatically become subscribers to my account, and by that, they'll be able to see my public posts, and not private ones. They can still send me messages when needed. The sender will ...


12

Assuming I found out that an acquaintance reuploaded a particular photo, how can I talk to them about them unintentionally damaging me and ask if they can give me credit without this situation turning awkward? I'd go with a private message first, start with expressing your gratitude that people actually use your picture (and seem to like it), then explain ...


12

Consider that she might be feeling as awkward about the situation as you are -- but you'll be at an impasse until one of you decides to do something about it. Walk right up to her cubicle, tomorrow morning if you can, and say this: Hi. I was feeling that it's kind of weird that we work next to each other and we've never been formally introduced. I'm ...


11

Just don't respond. No one will care and for the few people who do mention it ('didja see my email with the kitten in a bow-tie? wasn't it hilarious?'), just say you prefer lolcode to lolcats.


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