New answers tagged

-1

Say "thank you" or even "thanks for that!" and acknowledge them by looking at them. Then look back at your kid and continue the rest of your life. The goal is be polite and make this interaction as short as possible. If you bring anything to your response you may lengthen the interaction. Nothing good can come from trying to express your thoughts to them....


1

How you talk to this person relies primarily on two things: Your personality type FA’s personality type There should be a way to address FA in a way that doesn’t lower your dignity, but also doesn’t exacerbate FA’s pompous behavior. What Liz feels, quite honestly, is irrelevant unless FA is a vindictive and spiteful person who will either hurt Liz or ...


3

Depending on your attitude being slighlt confrontonial might help. I do such things in kinda joking manner to show that I noticed the poke and I can rebutt it. For example, if I heard metal is for violent lunatics I would say "that's why we have band called Party Cannon" or "only if we need to make sword out of lighting and kill dragons". Or if the sentece ...


11

There is a saying "if you have to ask, you can't afford it." This saying isn't true. A simple and honest approach would be I would love to have one of your works but they are so lovely, I suppose I can't afford them. How much would [a small piece, a simpler work, something like that one there] cost me? Note the deliberate wording of "cost me" not just "...


4

Though there's already an accepted answer from Kate Gregory, I'd venture my experience because I think that the accepted answer should be Step 2. While Step 1 should be: "Assume good intentions". The person might be thinking that they're being helpful and that you would appreciate their help. In which case starting with a harsh response would be ...


2

I have some experience with concerts (mostly heavy-metal ones, but pretty sure it's the same for any genre). Well, you are quite wrong in your statement. Please consider the following types of concerts, and their (basic) characteristics: heavy-metal concerts rules of etiquette kept at a minimum; people unleash their (full?) internal potential and energies;...


7

I feel I've had quite extensive experience of going to concerts and festivals. My first was 1992, my most recent was 2018, and that includes large festivals, medium-sized venues that hold a few thousand, and smaller, more intimate venues of perhaps 200 capacity. In my experience, I've observed that people go to concerts with different goals and expectations....


1

OP, please clarify your location. However, if you are talking about the USA or Germany, unfortunately it is. I would say it is common behavior when seating is not assigned. I’ve experienced this at various events, and so have my friends. This has happened at concerts and New Years festivities, both indoor and outdoor. It is also generally frowned upon, but ...


1

I have the same problem in the gym with guys who come up to me and tell me I'm doing an exercise wrong. Say Thank you for your advice and get on with your day. You do not owe them an explanation for why you are ignoring their advice. If they press the issue, keep it focused on your right to ignore them, which is absolute: My rights in this matter ...


0

Outside of explicit body language indicating that one person would like to be helpful and allow the other person to go first such as stepping to the side while holding the door, nodding or waving for the other person, I often choose to follow a first there, first to go method. Simply put the first person to reach the door is the first person who should be ...


6

I too have struggled with this, so I'll share a few things that I do to help ease the awkwardness. Oftentimes when two people approach a door at the same time, one will open it for the other. Body Language If one person is holding the door for the other, the body language is very simple to read. When I am holding a door open (and I've noticed the same of ...


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