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I think you'll find that they are simply throwing back your lazy method of enquiry. It's quite possible the people you are working with are feeling personally attacked when you walk around questioning what they are doing. People don't like to have themselves questioned for no given reason. Saying "Why not?" is a low-effort way to move the onus for ...


12

What is this theory? What exactly does it theorize? A theory, posing that depression and excessive reassurance seeking leads to interpersonal problems. It is nothing more than a framework used to study the interpersonal aspects of depression: How a depression influences the interpersonal interactions between a depressed person and the people they interact ...


7

Shy and introversion are different things that result in similar social results when compared in a single scenario. Being shy is a mild form of social anxiety. Which means the person is nervous, hesitant and uncomfortable with interacting with people even when they want to. Shy people are more likely to avoid conversation in the same way a fear of heights ...


7

Extraversion/introversion refers to how your social interactions relate to your mental/emotional energy levels. An extrovert feels as if they gain energy by interacting with people, while an introvert feels like those interactions cost them energy. This question is independent of how much you like people generally, or whether you like big or small groups. ...


6

Depression often leads to a lack of self-confidence. Though there is a human tendency to seek attention, prove our worthiness and get accepted by society, a lack of self-confidence leads people to ask if they're worthy and can be accepted. Those who are depressed often ask for worthiness and acceptance from their social relationships in order to alleviate ...


5

Depression is a major subject and also a somewhat broad term. It is estimated that 1 in 6 individuals in modern western civilizations suffer from it over their lifetime in such a way that it (severely) affects their functioning. It includes major depressive disorder (single episode or recurrent), dysthymia (chronic depressive mood which may include ...


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