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3

If you are sending the card to their home, inside mention everyone who lives in the home. That includes not only their partner but their children if you know of them. You don't have to write a personalized sentence to someone you've never met, but just include them: To Steve and Mary, instead of just To Steve If there are people whose names you don't ...


1

Thanksgiving is not a holiday where the invited guest is expected to reciprocate. Thanksgiving in the U.S. is simply a holiday where families of all kinds — direct family and otherwise — gathers to share a meal. It is not a holiday of gift exchanging. The guest’s presence at the meal is a gift enough. And not to be too crass about this, but if you are ...


6

I've been sending cards for over 30 years now and have yet to have anyone be angry with how I do it (except my wife for making her help...) so perhaps I can give some perspective. You're sending cards to the people that matter to you - let's start with that premise. You are right that you don't need to send cards to the parents/families - unless you have a ...


11

There are a couple of things in play here. One is that, you, being an international student, don't have a "place to go" for Thanksgiving. For us Americans, gathering together for holidays is important and many of us would gladly invite someone we know over so they are able to celebrate with us, rather than leave them alone for a holiday. ...


7

Your thought is quite polite, that is returning the invitation. Under normal circumstances you inviting them out to a restaurant is entirely valid, but mostly as a gesture of friendship, not directly as 'reciprocating' on Thanksgiving. Why? Well, Thanksgiving is 'special' in a way that Christmas is not. Partly this is because Christmas might actually be ...


-1

This is a great question and something that has irritated me about TV / Film making for more than a decade. In my opinion, it just ruins the integrity of every scene that they do it in (and they do it in every scene involving a phone call, in every TV show and every Film). Over many years, I have come to believe that this has evolved as a part of the "...


0

I suspect it may not necessarily be enough to just specify the United States. This may vary by region even within the US. I can only recall a handful of times I, or whoever I was talking to, simply hung up with no closing statement, and they all had unique circumstances. Things like the phone's battery dying leading to a follow-up call on a different phone ...


0

Phone conversations in movies are generally comically misrepresented, and not just the part where nobody says goodbye. there is usually very little introduction the person "on the other end" is never given nearly enough time to communicate the information that is supposedly communicated the person on the viewing end never gives any information (...


1

In my light, fictional reading I've come across many examples of people hanging up without anybody saying 'goodbye' or whatever. When I was in the U.S. in the late 1990's, I called my new landlord (in Bowling Green, KY) and as soon as we'd finished discussing the first reason I'd called -- he hung up! I called back but couldn't get a hold of him right away. ...


12

I wouldn't put a lot of stock into movies for how things work. The important thing in a movie is to keep the story moving, not to show a realistic portrayal of events. In movies, for instance: There's always a parking place in the city right in front of the building you want to enter. Yeah... good luck with that. People dying always have a final thing to ...


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