New answers tagged

0

I would email the person. Say that you've been hearing a beeping in some of your calls and not in others, and that you're nearly sure that this person is the common link. Apologize for being unable to concentrate with the beeping and acknowledge that many people can, and that others don't hear it. Ask the person if it's possible there's a nearby smoke ...


1

Your issue is 100% about providing feedback. Not going into the entire science of providing feedback, this a good course of action: Send an e-mail to the guy requesting a 10 minute discussion. There is no need for the discussion to be longer, only for the matter of the beeping. Begin the discussion by requesting the permission to bring some minor ...


2

I have to disagree with the accepted answer. Depending on the age and health of your parents, they may be completely reasonable in their fear of contracting this virus from you, and saying you understand and accept that risk isn't likely to appease them. Of course, probably everyone who works in the healthcare industry interacts with people who don't want to ...


7

I can speak from experience here - I started a company with a close friend. We were always on the same level, in the sense that we 'reported' to each other and there was no one else. After close to two years, we were acquired and my friend and I were to build a team within that company from the ground up. Initially, the team was still only the two of us. The ...


3

I worked in healthcare settings for around 9 years. Unfortunately, getting exposed to disease is an occupational hazard in that environment. A lot of this answer depends on your parents' fears and their reaction to them. Either they aren't reasonable WRT their fears, or they are. I'll try to answer both perspectives. If they aren't reasonable, there's ...


2

I agree completely with Geoffrey's answer, but I would just like to emphasise that most likely for your office, complaining to HR was a far worse violation of common curtesy than loud music playing. Quite ironic :) I work in a very small office with no HR at all, but I have worked in other mid sized offices and it was the same there too. Basically, when you ...


6

One conflict-avoidant option is to shift the focus away from yourself: Yeah, my customers have mentioned it - they can hear it when I'm trying to talk to them on the phone, it makes conversations difficult. This might get your co-worker to turn the music down, but it also risks an outcome where they only address the stated issues and not the ones that ...


2

Broken record method. Please use card to gain access. Please use CARD to gain access. Please USE card to gain access. Do not take responsibility. Do not blame rules. Explain it's the doors that require that. But, most importantly, talk with a supervisor or manager about enforcing the rule on your coworkers because it's not only disturbing your work (...


6

You can't without angering people. These people know they aren't following the rules. They also know they can get away with it. They know people will let them in because they don't want to be rude, and they are taking advantage of that. People who do this often get aggressive when they're refused, because they know this will often get the person refusing ...


-1

I have never ever heard of access being controlled by means that are expensive and open to anyone. And also, access card but no intercom? No wonder you get annoyed to open the door so much! Because you are regularly annoyed by people outside the window (regardless if you open or not), you have material for complaining to your management about the issue. ...


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