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104

It could be of course of great help if you could get the bouncer to acknowledge the mistake, or at the very least to disclose where the information come from, but I wouldn't count too much on it. Thankfully, even in absence of this, your social circle can search the local sex offenders registry and note that you are absent of it. As advised for example on ...


45

I've been in a similar situation and by my experience the #1 thing you need right now are a few allies. You won't be able to resolve this all by yourself. I had a good friend on the scene who is also a great IPS person and he came with me and we managed to resolve the situation before the event was over. After the fact, things are more tough. The situation ...


21

The answer here lies in building your own narrative. Right now, the prevailing narrative is that Anne met up with you at a bar and you were kicked to the curb for being a sex offender. Anne, shocked at learning this, is then spreading the news out of concern for other unaware people who know you. Not only is the information Anne's spreading blatantly false, ...


11

Warning: this is an arm-twisted way of solving the situation and it could damage your relationship with them. I have anxiety issues. Sometimes, people want me to go somewhere but, in my eyes, they aren't giving me enough information. Not having enough information can cause me a lot of (otherwise avoidable) stress and I don't like that. That's why, when the ...


6

There's one simple fact that I think is being overlooked here: They invited you to dinner. Generally speaking you don't invite someone to dinner if you want to have a hard conversation, because that could spoil everyone's appetite. A serious conversation, maybe, but not an accusatory one. I personally feel based on the information provided that there's ...


2

When I have friends over, I want to spend quality time with them, doing fun activities and chatting. I don't get visits that often, and it's usually a special occasion. For that reason, I defer any cleaning to after they're gone. I don't want to spend our precious time together doing chores alone instead of having fun together. Especially if it's something ...


1

This could be a good like a surprise, a business venture or this could be bad; the fact you are creeped out makes me lean towards bad. The way I see it is you have 3 likely scenarios, let's analyze them: Reputation damage, maybe they are going to try and falsely accuse your of something or try and twist what you said. (Try to #metoo you) Solution: Take a ...


1

Ten years living in East Asia speaking here... In summary: Address it casually and as often as it comes up. Start by understanding your situation: 1. Cultural difference: Generally among Far Eastern cultures, people feel more free about looking after each other; in the West if feels more like being nagged and nannied. She probably doesn't mean any offense ...


1

There are a couple of ways that are traditional in the United States for letting the community know of someone’s passing and any potential ceremonies. They are: Obituaries. These are listings in a local newspaper, and usually contain ceremonial information for public attendees, if applicable. Usually these are submitted by a funeral manager, but can be ...


1

I know from experience that coming out at work is hard to do. While I'm not trans myself, I was married to a trans person, and have lived with and dated a few trans folks over the years. At this point in US history, it can be particularly hard being trans. There's an awful lot of spotlight on trans rights issues and while in some instances that's really ...


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