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The basic principle is that total food brought equals (or slightly exceeds, to be safe) total food consumed. Thus, each person who will be eating a meal should bring at least one whole meal's "worth" of food, in terms of quantity, notwithstanding that the specific food by itself may not make a healthy or appetizing meal. You can think about this in ...


34

In general, if everyone brought a dish large enough to serve everyone, there would be far too much food. Suppose you expect 20 people and there are 4 "slots" to make a meal, consisting of an appetizer, an entrée, a side, and a dessert. If each person brings a dish for 20 people, everyone could be served with only 4 people bringing a dish. If all 20 ...


5

And here I was thinking that all those US high school movies were exaggerating things. Ignorant German me. ;-) From my own experience, someone who wasn't convinced so far won't be convinced by re-iterating the same arguments over. Therefore you have to find arguments, that are new. I've got two ideas, that may apply to your situation ... One thing you could ...


5

Frankly, I don't think you can. Typically when people first start dating someone new, they put in extra effort to be the best version of themselves they can. This might include being more attentive, making a point to schedule fun activities, being extra helpful, taking more care on their appearance, initiating conversations, etc. Usually part of it is ...


4

I honestly can't think of a time where I've ever decided to change how I treated someone in a relationship because of their passive aggressive behavior. In my experience communication is EVERYTHING and the lack of it destroys relationships. Hints never worked on me, nor did they help me in trying to use them to communicate my needs. I've learned (the hard ...


3

It depends, so you should ask the host (or even the group at large). There are several factors which could determine the answer: How perishable is the food? If there's leftover food, can/will the host keep it? If there's leftover food, can/will you bring it back with you? If there's leftover food from someone else, can/will you bring it back with you? How ...


2

If you come on your own, bring a bit more than is needed to feed one average person (may be 50 percent more). If everyone does that than the party has a bit more food than the whole group eats, which is Ok because not everyone likes the same food and some things will be left over. If the host warns you that some people tend to bring rubbish food (either very ...


2

Growing up in the Midwest, potluck dinners were a mainstay of my existence. They occurred after Lenten worship, Advent worship, and many Sunday festivals. You aren't expected to feed everyone. That's just silly. Basically the expectation, at least where I grew up, was that you brought enough to feed your party and one or two more people. Some dishes go ...


1

I am a US professor. I get occasinal questions from people who read my papers or course notes. See a related question of my own here. Please note that it does not apply to you! I'm linking to it because some of the explanations I give could clarify your understanding of interacting with professors in the US, which is what you are asking about. The US culture ...


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