7

As with any interpersonal intimate (not only sexual) relationship, being clear and honest in communicating is the key. Try to tell your partner what you wrote here, communicate what you want and what you are afraid of. Ask you partner for same: what are they afraid of, what they want to do. This is what me and my partner had to go through in order to figure ...


6

I'll put aside the cultural component here. Paying attention to culture is important, but that needs to happen from both sides. First of all, it is nearly impossible to change someone else's behavior. They have to want to change it, and they have to make that change. What you can do, however, is change your response to someone else's behavior. In doing ...


5

I used to be big on self-deprecating remarks. Then one of my friends complained, "Hey! You're bad-mouthing my best friend, and I won't stand for it!" I can't say it cured me instantly, but after a number of comments along those lines, I cut back a lot. Now, years later, I generally reserve self-deprecating remarks for areas where I really do struggle and ...


1

Just assume that he will be late. This is probably not the answer you want to hear, but in this circumstance it seems that correcting his behavior is near impossible (as baldPrussian said). Considering that he already experienced consequences of lateness (you leaving the restaurant) and that this presumably has not led him to apologize or attempt to correct ...


1

Short answers: 1. Tell them to trust the people who put them in their position! 2. Help them see that all systems of evaluation are quite limited. One thing that helped me, was to attribute my perceived shortcomings not only to me. If you actually fail hard (which happens less than people like to say), then it is not solely you that is responsible. In a "...


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